Why are Primary Schools Different in Holland?

Primary schools in Holland are different from those in other countries because of the Dutch educational system. The Dutch educational system is known as the ‘school voor alle leerlingen’, or ‘all pupils school’. 

This means that all children, regardless of their social background or ability, attend the same primary school. This contrasts with the British and American educational systems, in which children are typically separated according to their ability and social class. You may check this link if you want to know more about  Primary schools in Holland.

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The advantages of the Dutch educational system are that it stresses academic achievement rather than social status, and it encourages children to develop their own interests. A Programme and Skills Inventory (PSI) is an instrument that was designed to measure the skills of primary school children. 

The PSI contains four sets of questions, which are grouped into three main categories: reading comprehension, writing, and understanding and expressing information in other formats such as pictures, maps, graphs etc. The PSI was developed in the Netherlands, where a number of studies have demonstrated its validity and reliability.

What students are required to do at school?

Primary school in Holland is a mandatory educational institution for students between the ages of five and eleven. Students are required to attend school every day, except for religious holidays.

At primary school, students are required to do many different things. They are usually split into three classes: beginners, Mainstreamers, and Advanced Mainstreamers. Beginners are the smallest class, and they learn about basic subjects like math, science, and English. Mainstreamers are the largest class and they learn about more advanced subjects like Latin and history. Advanced Mainstreamers are in the middle of the two classes and they learn about subjects like literature and music.




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